Designing Your Own: If you’re choosing to design your own DIY wedding invitations, you probably have a good idea of what you’re hoping it will look like. You might even have a grasp of some of the skills you’ll be bringing to the table to make that vision a reality. Or, you’re hoping to learn a little more about the process and designing in general. Or maybe you just want to get a little crafty. All of these reasons, and more, are good reasons to do your own invites. We’ve got a whole bunch of extra tutorials, in case you want to brush up on a few skills before you put proverbial pen to paper.
It is not required to put the entourage in the invite. You can have a different piece of paper listing the members that can be put in pick invites-- specifically those that go to the entourage themselves, as well as to the extra immediate household as well as buddies. They would appreciate the souvenir; plus, it is a means of thanking them for their participation.
Very formal invitations include this information on a separate card. Otherwise, it can be printed on the wedding invitation itself if there is room; if the ceremony and reception are held in the same location, you may print "and afterward at the reception" or "reception immediately following." When the reception is elsewhere, the location goes on a different line.

Packaging And Embellishments: If you’re adding embellishments, or you’re mailing more than just an invite plus an RSVP card (we opted to mail more info, because of the destination aspect), keep track of the weight of your invitation suite once it’s all packed up. Depending on its size, you may be facing more postage fees than a simple stamp will cover. You can get a postage estimate using a kitchen scale and checking on the USPS website. Through the USPS website I also learned that square invites and envelopes cost more in postage, by a significant amount. It’s not worth it.
There are some family members that might have different participants in them, some that wedding publications and decorum guides are struggling to stay on top of. Exactly how can you consist of every person as if all are just as crucial?
Paper cutting: The Internet loves to tell you that if you are doing your own DIY wedding invitations, you need to invest in a professional paper cutter, or at least a rotary cutter, along with a tape gun, and the list goes on. You can skip this by ordering paper that’s cut to size—always double check to make sure you can print said format of course—and skipping any taped on embellishments. I promise, a fancy invitation need not have three layers of cardstock and the ability to stand on its own.
Crafty DIY brides, this project is for you! From creating your wedding invitations from scratch (major props!), or starting with a printable template (still, totally admirable), we’re all about taking this project into your own hands. If you’re thinking about DIY wedding invitations, we suggest leaving plenty of time for the process and starting several months before the wedding invitations are set to be mailed. Though this little project of yours may require more time than ordering traditional invitations, there is a surplus of inspirational resources that will make it just a little bit easier. From step-by-step tutorials on how to create watercolor invitations, to intricate envelope liners and options for tying it all together (note: yarn), there is no shortage of creativity. So if you’re looking to save a few dollars or just put your own spin on your wedding invites, look no further. We’ve rounded up 25 DIY wedding invitations and accent ideas that are anything but an art project gone awry. Just remember to have a meticulous hand. While each invitation may not look the same, it’s important they all have the same TLC from #1 to #201. After all, this is the first impression of your wedding! Make it great. 🙂
The couple’s parents should each be listed on separate lines, starting with the bride's or whoever’s name falls alphabetically first. Since both last names are included in the greeting, there’s no need to use last names for the to-be-weds—unless, again, if either of them has a different last name than their parents. In that case, list out their full name, in addition to the full names of their parents.
Is it OK to send wedding invitations online? Wedding guests still expect a paper invitation in the mail to reply to for your nuptials. Not to mention that with all of the email filters we have these days, your email invitation could very well get marked as spam and never reach an inbox. We live in a modern world and everything tends to be available online, which is why a wedding website is highly recommended to accompany your invitation. When you choose your invitations at Minted, you can match your website style to your wedding stationery.
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