From flowers to cake to decor, not to mention the dress, weddings can be incredibly expensive. Many brides these days try to counter this problem by making as much as they can and cutting corners on some things that might not matter quite so much. When I first thought about homemade wedding invitations, I thought “no.” When I looked at the possibilities for DIY wedding invites, I was both surprised and inspired. Some of the most lovely invitations I have seen, (and I’ve looked at lots!) handmade invitations give an extra special touch to your celebration because you took the time to make them yourself.
Once you’ve designed your invites, when do you send them? And what about save-the-date cards? The consensus is four to six months before your wedding for save-the-dates, but allow additional time if yours is a destination wedding. The number one etiquette tip for these is that save-the-dates only go to people you absolutely plan to invite to the wedding. List the city location to give adequate planning time for travel and lodging, even if your exact venue is still undecided. You can create a unique wedding hashtag and spread it to collect memories of your future event.
Very formal invitations include this information on a separate card. Otherwise, it can be printed on the wedding invitation itself if there is room; if the ceremony and reception are held in the same location, you may print "and afterward at the reception" or "reception immediately following." When the reception is elsewhere, the location goes on a different line.

If their names haven't been included in the host line, they should still take center stage a few lines down. No one would forget to add this to a wedding invitation, of course, but you might be wondering whose name should go first on a wedding invitation? Traditionally the name of the bride always precedes the groom's name. Formal invitations issued by the bride's parents refer to her by her first and middle names, the groom by his full name and title; if the couple is hosting by themselves, their titles are optional.
Traditionally, the bride's parents are the hosts of the wedding, and are named at the top of the invitation, even for very formal affairs. However, including the names of both sets of parents as hosts is a gracious option no matter who foots the bill. Also, more and more couples these days are hosting their own weddings, or do so together with their parents.
My husband and I will be celebrating our 40th “Ruby” wedding anniversary in January with a blow-out bash, and we’re as excited as soon-to-be newlyweds. We wanted formal invitations that reflect a winter theme and RED (because, you know, “Ruby”). We were fortunate enough to find Elegant Wedding Invites with the perfect glittery, snowflake effect, but it was advertised in blue. No worries! Within 24 hours, Elegant Wedding Invites was back with me assuring us that the invitation card could be in red. It’s everything we’d hoped for. EWI worked closely with me as we tweaked some things (our changes, not anything they’d done incorrectly) and were very prompt with our proofs. The quality of these invitations is very good, the price is more than fair, and EWI’s response time is immediate. We’re thrilled with their end product!

Designing Your Own: If you’re choosing to design your own DIY wedding invitations, you probably have a good idea of what you’re hoping it will look like. You might even have a grasp of some of the skills you’ll be bringing to the table to make that vision a reality. Or, you’re hoping to learn a little more about the process and designing in general. Or maybe you just want to get a little crafty. All of these reasons, and more, are good reasons to do your own invites. We’ve got a whole bunch of extra tutorials, in case you want to brush up on a few skills before you put proverbial pen to paper.
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